10 Feb2005

Duhh…what do you think it looks like? aodd1 I am normally quick on the uptake but I didn’t quite get this until I was reviewing my digital photo cache for the day. I was rushing through the fruit stalls on Salazar Street when I was confronted with a vendor that was smiling away and holding up this pineapple. I snapped a shot and wondered why he was being so jovial. So this wins the obscene fruit of the month award. And on that vein, I have decided to quickly feature three other unusual finds.

Next up, the most humongous Ponkan you have ever seen. aodd2Probably raised on the agricultural equivalent of steriods, these ponkan were at least six inches across and rather weighty. The calculator in the photograph is a normal sized calculator, not a mini, and it is dwarfed by these enormous oranges that were especially brought in for the Chinese New Year Holidays, I was told. What fertilizer was used to those???

Third, some really colorful dragon fruit. aodd3 Common in many asian countries from Vietnam, Thailand and up to China, it is just unusual to see it on the street here in Manila except near special holidays. The pink fruit (they also come in yellow) have scales and look somewhat pre-historic in nature. Inside is a white flesh dotted with tiny black edible seeds that give the fruit some crunch (kind of like poppy seeds but smaller). The flesh is sweet and slightly acidic and the texture is somewhat like kiwi fruit. It is high in vitamin C.

Finally, some great Bangkok mangoes. aodd4Though their tough skins remain green, the flesh turns a brilliant yellow orange, gets very sweet and has a distinct flavor. I am a big fan of Cebu mangoes but these are an interesting diversion once in a while.

Back to more common fruit reporting in future posts.

 

COMMENTS:

  1. Bubut says:

    Can you feature the fruit ‘Anonas’? Some are not familiar
    about it and they thought it’s the street somewhere in QC.
    I love that fruit and you can’t find that easily in the
    market. We have an Anonas tree at our backyard and it
    rarely brings fruit, just like 1 or 2 fruits in a year.

    Apr 19, 2005 | 8:18 pm

     
  2. Marketman says:

    Will have to do some research on anonas. Don’t think I have ever tasted it either but am curious now.

    Apr 20, 2005 | 6:28 am

     
  3. allen says:

    We had anonas trees on our farm when I was growing up. I don’t really remember what it looks like, like a cross between the atis and guyabano but without the bumps, smoooth peah skin; it also has a lot of seeds and tastes a bit like the atis too but not as sweet and a bit tart – or maybe what I had was still unripe hehe.

    Jan 27, 2007 | 12:11 am

     
 

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