06 Feb2005

Fresh pinipig was an absolute revelation. pinipig1I grew up in an era when Haagen Daz hadn’t yet been invented by some enterprising American who made up some glitzy Scandinavian sounding name, so my ice cream options were limited to Magnolia Drumsticks that inevitably leaked through their soggy bottoms before you ate halfway down the cone, or, better yet, Pinipig Crunch. Pinipig Crunch was a vanilla ice cream core covered in chocolate with pinipig imbedded beneath. For the longest time, this was my vision of pinipig. Turns out that this was a bad representation of a truly wonderful local delicacy — more puffed rice than real pinipig.

Pinipig is actually immature glutinous rice that is harvested and pounded into what looks more like light green flakes. The flakes are moist and redolent with a fragrance that is simply unique. They are almost the “essence” of rice. These flakes can be eaten raw but I think they are even better when toasted and used as a topping to an extravagant halo-halo (iced fruit dessert) or other traditional filipino dessert. Some restaurants used to replace pinipig with the more readily available corn flakes – yikes!

At the market recently, I picked up several hands full of fresh pinipig for just P30. pinipig1Toasted up they retained their bright green (almost chartreuse) color yet were extremely crisp. They can also be fried but turn a light brown. As always, I often find that the original is hard to beat. Give me fresh pinipig any day over puffed rice or corn flakes, thanks.

 

COMMENTS:

  1. BKF says:

    Fresh green pinipig is also best when made into biko (or something similar). Top with fresh carabao’s milk.
    Heaven…

    Feb 7, 2005 | 4:53 pm

     
  2. schatzli says:

    We used to spend summer holidays with distant relatives
    in Samar.Highlights of the holidays include the rice harvest..
    I have learned how to use “bayo” and witnesses the whole
    process of the harvest and the celebration itself.
    This was the time too I had my first ever home made PINIPIG.
    OH THEY WERE SO HEAVENLY!

    Mar 8, 2005 | 4:39 pm

     
  3. Marketman says:

    I keep forgetting to post that these are apparently artificially colored pinipig. Karen over at Pilgrim’s Pots and Pans has wonderful entries on duman and other rice specialties from her hometown and I am humbled by my lack of knowledge in the rice area…at any rate these do still taste good but they aren’t the cream of the crop apparently…

    Feb 10, 2006 | 7:50 pm

     
  4. millet says:

    a long time ago, my lola used to buy fresh green pinipig which smelled heavenly, and which we would put in bowl and eat with milk and sugar. that pinipig was a lighter shade of green than the ones sold now, and my lola said they were colored by rubbing them between banana leaves. no food colors. since she was born and raised in manila, i am pretty sure she was not speaking from first-hand experience. wonder if anybody can confirm this? and yes, green pinipig makes the best biko.

    Sep 1, 2006 | 7:55 am

     
  5. Mervin Yapan says:

    I am interested of this product Pinipig and need to know the suppliers company name and contact number.

    Thank you

    May 17, 2007 | 5:00 pm

     
  6. JOVEL MAGDAYAO says:

    PINIPIG ALSO GOOD TO MIXED IN ICE DROP,ICE CREAM SOME SUPPLIERS NEED THESE PRODUCT FOR SOMETHING IT IS GENERAL IN PHILIPPINES AND SOME COUNTRY.

    Jul 25, 2007 | 6:46 pm

     
  7. marjorie says:

    pls. give me ur contact number i want to have a franchise of magnolia ice cream because the market here in our place is too far so i like to sale your product to have an extra income and also to give enjoyment to my consumers
    thank you

    Aug 21, 2007 | 12:06 am

     
  8. Alice Peralta says:

    I am interested with this product Pinipig and need to know the suppliers/manufacturers company name, address and contact number.

    Aug 8, 2008 | 5:33 pm

     
 

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