23 Nov2005

Taho / Soybean Custard

by Marketman

Every morning and afternoon the familiar bellow of the neighborhood taho1taho vendor cuts through the din of traffic from nearby streets, the rustling of leaves from the garden and the hum of man-made electrical appliances. It is an almost animal like howl, the last syllable hanging in the air for what seems like seconds. By the time you grab PHP10 and get to your gate, he is just in front of it. While I am generally fond of soybean curd, I never grew up eating taho as it was considered one of those potentially “dirty” street foods. Today, we live in a gated community and it actually surprises yet delights me that Mang Amado appears to be the sole ambulant vendor that is allowed to ply his trade within the village (I can only surmise that he must have great connections or a large adoring public). I sometimes think I should come up with some outrageously delicious snack and walk door to door to make a living, get some exercise and meet new people…

This snack appears in many forms throughout Southeast Asia, and taho2Indonesians had it with a sugared syrup as well. The soybean custard is silky smooth and it generally flavored with sweet brown molasses syrup and in some cases sagu or tapioca is also added. In the morning run, the taho is often still warm while by the afternoon it is cold and sometimes even better if left in the refrigerator for an hour or so. Healthy except for the sugar content, this high protein, low fat and low cost snack is delicious, nutritious and economical. My daughter likes it and has been buying it from Mang Amado with increasing frequency…I try not to put the same streetfood biases my parents had in the 1960’s… but I do sometimes fret about hygiene issues, especially with those old lingering warnings that it was made with “Plaster of Paris” and other such bizarre tales… She does give Mang Amado her own glass and eats it in the house with our spoons… When we stopped him the other day to get some taho and to take his photo for this post, it was the first time that I really took notice of the contraption used to carry the taho; it hangs at different heights and the shape of the stainless or tin buckets differs…he claims simply for balance when walking. On a good day he probably sells upwards of 80 servings for a daily gross income of PHP800; backbreaking work done at a stately pace with frequent stops and just a bit of chismis.

 

COMMENTS:

  1. meekerz says:

    Ahhh. I love taho! :)

    Selling taho is indeed backbreaking work. A friend who supplies taho to vendors, tried selling door to door as part of his ‘immersing himself into the culture’ thing –he is physically fit –yet he could not finish a day’s work, and went home with a sore body and awe at how these people can do this everyday.

    Newbie to the site, love it! I reached here from a link from dessert comes first.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 1:26 pm

     
  2. ana says:

    I’ve been telling everyone that Plaster of Paris is used in taho but they wouldn’t believe me. It’s true, I saw it first hand. A balikbayan uncle once asked a suki taho vendor to teach him how to make it. Plaster of Paris was one of his ingredients. We all freaked out! We didn’t have him put it and it turned out so watery, so unlike the taho we know. We stopped eating taho for quite a while but I just had one last Sunday morning =) It’s just so good. I don’t know what the effects would be so I only eat it once in a while haha!

    Nov 23, 2005 | 1:49 pm

     
  3. hazel says:

    I miss taho! I can’t find it anywhere here in Q8.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 1:57 pm

     
  4. Gigi says:

    Oh dear heavens. I’m 31 years too late in getting the memo on taho mixed in with Plaster of Paris. Let’s just see how long I’ll live. Anyway, taho is my early morning fix when I walk to the gym. I like it now without the sugared syrup and sago.

    I like surprising the magtataho and giving P20 for a P10 glass and not asking for the change back. It brightens my day as much as it brightens his. It’s the best way to eat taho — with a skip and a hop. :)

    Nov 23, 2005 | 2:23 pm

     
  5. rina says:

    streetfood in style(and for the streetfood phobic)….Gloria Maris serves taho in a wooden bucket good for a small group. i miss taho!

    Nov 23, 2005 | 4:00 pm

     
  6. willy says:

    out here in the states, you can get real taho at the tofu house (san jose, ca.)…or you can buy the soft tofu from the oriental supermarket (ranch 99)…they come in different flavors…but i usually get the unflavored, make my own sugar syrup… but nothing beats the taho they sell in the philippines…

    Nov 23, 2005 | 4:37 pm

     
  7. fried-neurons says:

    Mmmm… I love taho! When we were kids, my brother and I were the magtataho’s best customers, because everyday (during the summer break) we would buy from him and tell him to fill up our REALLY BIG plastic tumblers almost to the top.

    These days I get my fill of taho from Goldilock’s. A lot of dim sum places also serve something similar to taho, but the syrup is lighter and less thick, and it tastes slightly of ginger. Not quite the same.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 4:38 pm

     
  8. ajienaissant says:

    Taho is the best. Our vendor goes tahooo, suki, tahoo :D
    Its super nice with extra sago and arnibal. yummy. I prefer mine hot so i like the morning batch (the afternoon would be leftovers from the morning daw kasi)

    Nov 23, 2005 | 5:29 pm

     
  9. oscar says:

    Plaster of Paris is not necessarily toxic, but if you’re going to eat, say a teaspoon of that powder, then it will solidify in your gut and obstruct the flow of food and your other juices. It’s mixed with water to make molds and sculptures by the way. I don’t know how much plaster the taho makers use, but it’s best to eat taho in moderation if you’re wary of Plaster of Paris.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 5:30 pm

     
  10. Mila says:

    The gloria maris taho is very good and, hopefully, doesn’t use the plaster to make it white and creamy. But there’s nothing like getting a glass of the streetside (mobile) version. Just like dirty ice-cream doesn’t taste as good if it’s not eaten on the streets of Manila.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 5:54 pm

     
  11. virgilio says:

    I was hoping to find a recipe for taho at the end of your writeup as I’ve always wanted to make taho where I live: for own consumption, and hmmm…make business? Seriously now, how does one make taho? I love it although I think my uric acid will never ever get down to normal. Soya and soya products are supposed to be healthy but my doctor here says otherwise -in my case anyway. Will appreciate it very much if you can post a recipe on taho. Thanks.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 6:09 pm

     
  12. edee says:

    mmmm taho…..bring back happy childhood memories…..just like your family marketman, we have our own glasses/tumblers di pa yata uso noon na may dalang plastic cups ang mag-tataho :) ….this will be perfect for winter mornings, to chase the chills away….pero, only in my dreams lang as i don’t know where to get taho here! …..

    Nov 23, 2005 | 6:22 pm

     
  13. Katrina says:

    As another taho lover, I’d like to know the truth behind this Plaster of Paris story; it’s horrifying!

    My dad always said that taho was one street food you knew was clean, because (supposedly) it would not solidify if there was even a little dirt in the mixture. No idea if this is true or apocryphal.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 6:33 pm

     
  14. Noelle says:

    I don’t buy my taho from street vendors. Instead, I head to the nearest Uncle Finn’s Soya hutch. There’s one in Glorietta, I know, but I go to the organic market at Lung Center on Sundays and they have a stall there too. I don’t think they put Plaster of Paris in their taho as they also sell fresh tofu.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 6:44 pm

     
  15. joey says:

    I love taho, and yes, have also heard the plaster of paris claims. But I thought it was a myth! Oh dear.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 6:48 pm

     
  16. thess says:

    Hi MM!
    oh man! i suddenly miss home :(
    i guess the best part for me was the nagging, for more sagu and arnibal when buying taho (^-^)

    Nov 23, 2005 | 7:35 pm

     
  17. Frayed says:

    I used to get excited when I’d hear the taho man. I guess this was our version of America’s ice cream truck. It used to cost 50 centavos. Or was it P1? I’m talking circa ’76. I was glad to read about the health benefits of taho/tofu later on, esp for women. Wonder if the plaster of paris cancelled out its good effects though…

    Nov 23, 2005 | 7:50 pm

     
  18. kulasa says:

    I’ve heard about this of plaster of paris issue but I too thought it was a myth. Like Katrina, my parents would tell us that taho will not solidify if there was just a bit of dirt in it. Whatever it is in taho- nothing that beats having it early morning.

    What I noticed though, yung sago na kasama parang lumiliit.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 8:11 pm

     
  19. fried-neurons says:

    Hi all,

    I Googled “plaster of paris tofu” and saw quite a few websites that talk about this. Apparently this isn’t an urban legend. Plaster of paris, AKA gypsym, AKA calcium sulfate, is the standard ingredient used to coagulate soy milk into tofu/taho. So que se taho sa tabi-tabi or tofu from a Chinese restaurant, chances are what you’re eating will contain plaster of paris. Apparently, Japanese style tofu is curdled with something else (extracted from seawater)… and you could also use some kind of organic acid instead. Take a look at the Wikipedia entry on tofu:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tofu

    Note that if you buy taho/tofu that is marketed as being a good source of calcium, then it definitely IS made with gypsum.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 8:23 pm

     
  20. Marketman says:

    Oh my gosh, I thought the plaster of paris story was apocryphal! Yikes, not sure I want my insides to turn into a statue! Thanks for that link, fried neurons!

    Nov 23, 2005 | 11:01 pm

     
  21. Jean says:

    Plaster of Paris?! That’s a new one on me! I do know that “nigari” ingredient is used to solidfy soy bean milk but unfortunately can’t get that anywhere. I guess this particular ingredient doesn’t keep well on the shelf.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 11:02 pm

     
  22. Jean says:

    MM, need to consider colonics.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 11:14 pm

     
  23. Pete says:

    I love taho. I could really care less if it had plaster of paris in it. As long as its not toxic. Thinking about eating taho, just brings back good memories from my chilhood in Manila. I think i will try to make my own with some silken tofu. I’ll let you guys know how it turns out.

    Nov 23, 2005 | 11:34 pm

     
  24. schatzli says:

    oh dear…what ever chemical is it.. i still love taho.
    When I was growing up in a small town in Cebu we didnt have taho, I cant remember this being sold at the city.

    My memories of taho is when we spend our holidays in Pasig.
    Tahooooooo, sometimes I would oversleep and damn I miss mang taho but my lola’s housekeeper knowing how much i love this would buy and keep them in the fridge. what joy…

    Nov 24, 2005 | 4:53 am

     
  25. angelo says:

    Did a little research and discovered that there are three basic coagulants used in processing tofu. One can either choose Nigari, calcium sulfate or lemon juice.

    The Japaneses use Nigari which is obtained after drying seawater under the heat of the sun.The process is somewhat similar to making sea salt. Check:http://www.kameyamado.com/english/how_nigari_is_made.html

    The Calcium Sulfate used in making Tofu or Taho is food grade calcium sulfate. The phrase “food grade” should provide the distinction between the safe and edible Calcium Sulfate from the Calcium Sulfate that is a component of Plaster of Paris.
    If arguably Plaster of Paris is being used, then by now we have an archipelago of Taho lovers whose innards and entrial are molded and casted for posterity.

    Nov 24, 2005 | 6:34 am

     
  26. angelo says:

    oops i pressed the button accidentally w/o editing.

    I really meant to write… If arguably Plaster of Paris is being used as a coagulant, then by now we have an archipelago of Taho-lovers whose innards and entrails are casted in posterity for the curious Martians to ogle when they land on earth.
    There.

    P.S.– This post makes me a lurker no more.

    Nov 24, 2005 | 6:46 am

     
  27. stef says:

    LOLOL!!! marketman selling taho? i think i’ll buy a ticket home just to see that!

    as for the plaster of paris a.k.a. calcium sulfate, the Chinese have been using it for 2000+ years to make taho. yes, there are alternatives such as the nigari mentioned here, however, calcium sulfate is essential to achieve the texture we know as taho, IOW, it’s not taho if they don’t put it in. moreover, the type (food-grade as angelo points out) and amount they use wouldn’t/shouldn’t harm a human eating it (unless you consume vast quantities). when used in taho, calcium sulfate’s primary purpose is as a COAGULANT, not a preservative. the usda has deemed it safe for human consumption IF it is used the way it’s intended to be used. so no worries, keep eating your taho!

    Nov 24, 2005 | 7:04 am

     
  28. Maricel says:

    Hi Virgilio! Here is a recipe I found in my files. I’ve had it since forever but I haven’t tried it. I got it from a magazine and can no longer remember the source

    TAHO

    3 c soy beans 4 bars white gulaman
    12 c water 14 c water
    SYRUP:
    6 c brown sugar vanilla
    2 c water

    Soak soy beans in water overnight. Grind in the blender with 12 cups water. Set aside. Boil gulaman with 14 cups water. Add to soybean mixture. Boil for 7 minutes or until starchy flavor disappears. Strain through a cheesecloth. Set aside to cool. Serve with syrup and sago. To make the syrup, boil together the sugar and water until thick. Flavor with vanilla.

    Nov 24, 2005 | 8:32 am

     
  29. IvanM says:

    Plaster of Paris mixed with taho??> My gawd, I have been out of touch for a loonng time!

    I find that the best way to eat taho is when youre stomach’s empty, the feeling of that sweet, warm liquid gushing from your throat to your stomach is enough to have make someone rise up in the correct side of the bed. ;o)

    Mm,

    Now that you’ve noticed it, it really takes skill to carry a pinga, not only that, you have to have exta padding too in your shoulders (bare bones and wood dont really mix!).

    The famous Ma Mon Luk carried a pinga for over 30 years selling noodles that he shoulder eventually drooped down.

    And its not as easy as we think, Ive tried carrying rice in a pinga in the fields of Banaue (Rice Terraces) and they must have weighed a ton! To think that kids were carrying so effortlessly!

    Nov 24, 2005 | 10:07 am

     
  30. Butch says:

    I learned to eat taho when I was in my 30s. But it was the cold version that was flavored and sold in supermarkets.

    Now that I’m in my 40s, I learned the value of taking soya as part of my regular diet. I buy it from the “magtataho” who has “exclusive” rights in our village.

    What’s the verdict on the “plaster of paris” issue?

    Nov 24, 2005 | 10:35 am

     
  31. Gigi says:

    THANATOS! Had my taho this morning. I felt indefatigable…. Hahaha.

    Nov 24, 2005 | 11:05 am

     
  32. Bubut says:

    yes, taho wont solidify if its dirty and the leftovers of taho will be processed to become TOKWA.. w/c means tokwa in the market got plaster of paris too ?

    Nov 24, 2005 | 11:40 am

     
  33. Marketman says:

    I really never thought much about the plaster of paris comment. But it turns out that it is simply the chemical form that appears to be useful for this food preparation…I am hoping that legions and I mean millions of folks around the region are eating anything truly poisonous… it just sounds so scary, doesn’t it?

    Nov 24, 2005 | 11:48 am

     
  34. acidboy says:

    i certainly would like to dispel rumors about plaster of paris being added to taho. that is certainly not true (at least in these times). and its also not true formalin is also added to taho to preserve it. i have business interests with a tofu/beancurd factory and the company used to supply taho to vendors plying the manila, mandaluyong and makati area and most definitely no plaster of paris is added to the food. if you must know, FOOD-GRADE calcium sulfate is sometimes added to soybean products for coagulation, much like it is added in other tofu products: tokwa, beancurd skin, hard tofu, silky tofu, toho, soybean paste, soy ice cream, soft tofu….

    one thing consumers must know though is soybeans used to make taho are gmo beans, mostly coming from the united states.

    Nov 24, 2005 | 12:20 pm

     
  35. stef says:

    yup, yup. i was going to say, i’d be more concerned about GMO stuff rather than about the amount of calcium sulfate that goes into taho. unless you’re dealing with an unscrupulous vendor who doesn’t think twice about using non-food-grade stuff…. i don’t know, what’s more expensive? i would imagine the food-grade… but just thinking aloud here…

    Nov 24, 2005 | 12:47 pm

     
  36. tulip says:

    Hi Marketman, I just browsed the inq7.net site awhile ago and found this..http://news.inq7.net/lifestyle/index.php?index=3&story_id=57540&published_site=28

    Nov 24, 2005 | 12:50 pm

     
  37. Marketman says:

    Thanks Tulip, quite a few visitors today came through the Inquirer…

    Nov 24, 2005 | 1:17 pm

     
  38. Mila says:

    Does that mean Inquirer has apologized for the photonapping?

    Nov 24, 2005 | 2:47 pm

     
  39. virgilio says:

    Many thanks, Maricel for the taho recipe. Will try it soon, so soon that I don’t think I can wait overnight for the beans to get tender. I’ll substitute silken tofu for the beans. Plaster of Paris is missing :)

    Nov 24, 2005 | 3:57 pm

     
  40. Kai says:

    Our magtataho offers either the taho or the soya milk in pet bottles which is the taho before the coagulant is added. I think most magtataho carry these bottles around, try asking them. If not, maybe you could request your magtataho to bring some next time around. To cast the worry away, buy the soya milk and cook in it Knoxx gelatin, or maybe even cornstarch, so it would get the consistency of taho. I tried drinking it like milk and using at as creamer but the taho taste was just too much.

    But honestly, I’ve played with plaster of paris in grade school, and at the very fast rate it hardens after the addition of water, I’d rather think it’s not the coagulant added to taho.

    Nov 24, 2005 | 4:18 pm

     
  41. Marketman says:

    mila, seems that is all the Inquirer are willing to do… not sure if that’s the end of the story for Karen who may go further…

    Nov 24, 2005 | 5:11 pm

     
  42. Lani says:

    Like Noelle, I also buy taho from Uncle Finn’s soya in Lung Center of the Philippines parking area every Sunday. The taho being sold there is delicious also but I just couldn’t explain why the taho being sold by our Manong vendor is more delicious than the one being sold in UFs (hehehe).

    Nov 24, 2005 | 6:08 pm

     
  43. Noelle says:

    “if you must know, FOOD-GRADE calcium sulfate is sometimes added to soybean products for coagulation, much like it is added in other tofu products: tokwa, beancurd skin, hard tofu, silky tofu, toho, soybean paste, soy ice cream, soft tofu…”

    That’s good to know, acidboy. Just clarifying here that there’s a difference between food-grade calcium sulfate and Plaster of Paris. :D

    Lani, maybe your manong vendor has better arnibal. I don’t take my taho with arnibal–I’m a heretic!–and I find that UFs’ taho is delicious by itself (and a packet of Equal).

    Nov 24, 2005 | 6:30 pm

     
  44. Jean says:

    First it’s plaster of paris now it’s this:

    http://www.womeninmining.org/products.htm

    LIMESTONE: A sedimentary rock containing calcium carbonate in the form of the mineral calcite, CaCO3, or as a combined calcium-magnesium carbonate in the form of the mineral dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2. Limestone has widespread uses including aggregates, cement, building blocks, the refining of sugar, manufacture of glass, making paint, brown paper bags, glass manufacturing, paint and of course the coating on chewing gum. For photographs and more information on limestone click on “Limestone”.

    And we all wonder why we can’t get rid of that last 10 pounds….

    Nov 24, 2005 | 11:45 pm

     
  45. Marketman says:

    Too funny. I just have to smile. I’m not sure I WANT to know everything that goes into my food. Heehee.

    Nov 25, 2005 | 6:30 am

     
  46. ana says:

    OMIGOD! hahaha… I have caused an uproar. Oh well, I still eat taho myself even with the Plaster of Paris thing.

    Nov 25, 2005 | 11:48 am

     
  47. Noelle says:

    food-grade calcium sulfate is not the same thing as Plaster of Paris (which is calcium sulfate hemihydrate–not the same substance).

    Nov 25, 2005 | 6:59 pm

     
  48. millet says:

    yes, first time i read about plaster of paris in taho was ages ago, when i was a teenager, and now i’ve got teenage sons myself, and we’re all taho lovers. when i start getting antsy about the plaster of paris in my system (so that explains why my jeans won’t zip up today!)i make my own pseudo-taho with soymilk in tetrapaks (found in most supermarkets –if you’re gmo-conscious, there are organic, non-gmo brands specifically labelled) and a bit of gulaman powder. when it gels, i cut it up into cubes and add the requisite arnibal and sago. ends up looking sort of like almond jelly, but it’s good enough to quiet a hankering when manong magtataho is not around, or when “calcium sulfate hemihydrate” just sounds too heavy in the gut ;->

    Nov 27, 2005 | 10:35 am

     
  49. Chris says:

    No need to worry about the amount of plaster of paris that goes into taho. It’s a coagulating agent, it’s purpose is to serve as a catlyst for the coagulating process, and not to “set” or thicken the taho like the way gulaman sets it in the recipe provided above, or the way cornstarch thickens sauces.

    Nov 27, 2005 | 4:56 pm

     
  50. Wilson Cariaga says:

    for a low calorie option try taho without the syrup just the soya and sago it is still good. . .

    Nov 29, 2005 | 10:42 pm

     
  51. rampau says:

    Hong Kong street taho which is sold at night uses brown sugar not syrup. The Dimsum places use ginger flavored syrup. The pinoy morning taho is so dark it looks like molasses was used. I like them all! Last time I bought pinoy taho though, I couldnt finish it. It didnt taste that good.

    Dec 2, 2005 | 11:02 pm

     
  52. kenny says:

    hey guys… i need some review of related literature about taho vendors…pls send some…tnx

    Dec 3, 2005 | 3:33 pm

     
  53. Caloy Mejia says:

    I just can’t imagine taho with plaster of Paris! oh! my!
    I think someday they’ll come up with another bloody concoction with my kids favorite snacks. Anyway thank you very much for this article. And, thank you for the recipe too.. but I’ll never try doing it with plaster of Paris

    Dec 6, 2005 | 7:28 am

     
  54. Bernard says:

    Is venturing into Taho business is a good idea? how much would it cost to start the opertaion? any school that offer seminars on this? thanks in advance…

    Dec 7, 2005 | 11:54 am

     
  55. VIM says:

    fellas…….ived been eating taho and as much selling it also…i dnt add plaster of paris in it..its natural and give as much more flavor hope all of you will go here in naga to bye one..hehe…

    Dec 15, 2005 | 1:29 pm

     
  56. VIM says:

    fellas…….ived been eating taho and as much selling it also…i dnt add plaster of paris in it..its natural and give as much more flavor hope all of you will go here in naga to bye one..hehe…

    By the way here is my versio of taho recipe:

    HOW TO MAKE TAHO

    1.) Soak soya beans for 30 mins. in topwater. see video
    2.) Dehull the soya beans using your hands until skin of beans are peeled. see video
    3.) Soak the soya beans for 8 hours with generous amount of water. After 8 hours, grind the soaked beans as fine as possible(you can use a blender), then cooked it and let it boil in 180 degrees for about 20 mins. see video
    4.) Drain the cooked soya beans to seperate the soya milk to the soy pulp. Make sure you squeeze all the soya pulp for excess soya milk.(you can use a ine piece of cloth) see video
    5.) Then apply a coagulating powder. Stir one or twice until gel-like form is achieved. see video
    6.) Put toppings: Sago, Syrup and milk. see video
    7.) Enjoy eating!;-)

    For the Taho/Tawa syrups
    1 cup brown sugar
    1 cup water
    Dissolve sugar in water and let it boil for 5 minutes. Use more sugar and cook longer if you want thicker syrup.

    Dec 15, 2005 | 1:32 pm

     
  57. allay_d_cutie says:

    omg…i really really LOVE taho so much! im CRAVING FOR IT besides its tasty it’s also nutritious! yummy!

    Mar 8, 2006 | 6:41 pm

     
  58. allay_d_cutie says:

    haay craving for taho.love yah taho! try the taho in VEGEFOODS! i San Juan near the mandaluyong it is sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo sarappy yummy!

    Mar 8, 2006 | 6:53 pm

     
  59. smoothe11bi says:

    ohhhh….grabe….i LOVE taho. this is one of the best things about the philippines.WE HAVE TAHO!!!. when i was a kid, our whole family would buy taho every saturday. the magtataho would always pass by outside the gate. eh, yung 10 pesos, masyadong mahal so kumukuha kami ng LARGE bowl at yun ang ginagamit namin for only 5 pesos…super sulit pa, ang sarap pa…Oh my,m i just love eating taho.

    Sep 23, 2006 | 10:53 pm

     
  60. LUZ says:

    taho so far is one of the best! i usually get my taho at goldilocks in san jose ca.
    now about the ingredients, u dont have to put alot of syrup just put little amount of the sugar and its good.

    Oct 8, 2006 | 7:34 am

     
  61. Merry Ann says:

    Taho is also best for pregnant women. It helps in the development of brain of babies while in the womb.

    Oct 9, 2006 | 3:20 pm

     
  62. Marvin says:

    Yaaahh!!! super sarap ng taho!!! I always crave for it every morning..i always get my favorite mug just to be filled with taho..for a cheap price of 10 solve na ako…Yummy..

    May 15, 2007 | 3:59 pm

     
  63. Dhangge says:

    it’s a joyful surprise to find a website that talks about taho! : ) i have just rediscovered the joy of eating taho..as in everyday, dinadalhan nko ng mgtataho, 3x a day actually. i’m trying to lose some weight, so naisip ko, instead na madami rice ako kainin, samahan ko ng taho. atleast mabubusog ako w/less rice intake.

    i’ve always eaten taho in the mornings when i was a kid.. my parents being believers of its positive effects on my young mind & body (they never believed in the plaster of paris thing). and now, mga pamangkin ko naman ka-jamming ko sa taho..

    by the way, have u tried eating taho na may kasamang evaporated milk? ung isang taho vendor kc dito samin, nglalagay ng evap milk sa tinitinda nya (pag nsa baso na huh! d nya halo sa buong container). i tried it once, ok nmn..pro iba pa rin ang orig taho!

    Jun 9, 2007 | 11:56 am

     
  64. peter penero says:

    hello friends,

    im peter of mabalacat, pampanga. i really want to have taho business in our place and as augmentation to my small take homepay.please lend me some pointers and advises to try into this.
    yhank you so much.

    Aug 6, 2007 | 5:21 pm

     
  65. cj says:

    please kindly send me the selling price of taho.i need it for my research.and how much would be the the profit for this?i am much in need of those information?

    Aug 13, 2007 | 3:43 pm

     
  66. chick says:

    i like it w/ just a bit of arnibal but lots of sago then eat it chilled! :D

    Aug 16, 2007 | 4:19 pm

     
  67. ma.lourdes manalo says:

    hi!i’m lourdes of san pablo laguna.i’m just a plain housewife now and i really want to have taho business in our place.please lend me some pointers and advises to try into this.and please kindly send me the selling price of taho.and how much would be the the profit for this.tnx & rgds

    Sep 2, 2007 | 5:29 am

     
  68. Marketman says:

    Ma. Lourdes, sorry, I have never made taho from scratch.

    Sep 2, 2007 | 8:27 am

     
  69. burukukung says:

    hi marketman,

    kindly send me the way you make taho for business including the capital and profit. in any volume of taho. (1 galoon/container or more, as you like) thanks! God bless!!!

    Sep 5, 2007 | 2:56 am

     
  70. don mejia says:

    now you can buy Taho making machine set ( Bean grinder MH230 Mh203 boiler) Simply text or call +63920-9241801 Don
    or eamil at avcdon@yahoo.com

    Cost and Income: Feasibility Study (Sept/2007)
    Output-60 liters
    6kls soy beans @ P35kl 210.00
    4.5 kls sugar @p40kilo 180.00
    240 pcs. Disposssable cups @0.60 each 151.20
    Gas & others 50.00
    Manpower 250.00
    investment total 841.20

    63L = 63ml250ml = 250 cups o 250ml.
    selling cup P10cup
    Gross income 2,520.00
    Net Income 1,678.80

    No sago/tapioca in the sample computation. Subject to change in price of soy beans and sugar.

    Sep 12, 2007 | 1:05 pm

     
  71. Jam says:

    Pls send me how to make taho and ano yong coagulating powder nun and san yon available… pls tnx a lot

    Sep 29, 2007 | 12:45 am

     
  72. bomchikawawa says:

    where do u find taho here in the US?

    Oct 2, 2007 | 3:33 am

     
  73. Jopet says:

    There’s a small little taho place run by Chinese people that tastes almost authentic (I haven’t had real taho since 99, and before then 87).

    It’s on Mott Street, just south of Bayard in Chinatown (East side of the street). There’s a poster board sign outside that indicates they sell taho. It costs around $1.50 for a small and around $3 for a large. The next time I head down there, I’ll mark down the address.

    Jan 3, 2008 | 7:34 am

     
  74. eduardo says:

    “the hum of man-made electrical appliances”? Aren’t they all man-made?

    Feb 14, 2008 | 12:11 pm

     
  75. kurous kat says:

    I have researched on gypsum powder and plaster of Paris and I found out that they are practically the same. Just use google or wikipedia. I found out that there is nothing toxic about plaster of Paris and it is used all over the world including the United States, England, and Germany, in making tofu. It is the concentration that matters. If you put too much, it hardens like cement similar to those used on statues. But if you just use a little, it will just coagulate the mixture. So you have nothing to worry about eating taho because if they put too much plaster of paris, it will be too hard to eat. Anything, including water, salt and vitamins, when taken excessively will be dangerous. Anyway, all of us need some calcium in the diet to prevent osteoporosis. So eat your taho.

    Mar 20, 2008 | 6:12 am

     
  76. rosalie andra says:

    I want to own my taho business can you help me where to buy the ingredients anh how to make it, and tofu as well

    Apr 13, 2008 | 2:41 pm

     
  77. rybaxs says:

    taho!.. in our office,everyday we buy TAHO. even rain or shine,taho is always available.. always enthusiasm in every move.

    Apr 28, 2008 | 11:16 am

     
  78. Fynn says:

    There’s a restaurant here in Vancouver B.C. at Fraser St. that serves taho Gloria Maris style. I can’t remember the name of the resto…I only saw it in a Chinese TV commercial and I don’t speak Chinese. Anyone out there who knows what I’m talking ’bout? Please tell me if you know the place sige naaa… I miss taho e.

    Do you really use gulaman to make it coagulate? Or is that just a short cut?

    May 18, 2008 | 1:23 pm

     
  79. bing says:

    Interested in starting the taho business here in the land of OZ. if u use an ordinary blender, will it make any difference? about the bean grinder machine, is it big? can u transport it overseas?
    thanks

    Jul 15, 2008 | 10:16 am

     
  80. Taho Station says:

    Hello Everybody! Please check our information website …

    http://WWW.TAHOSTATION.WETPAINT.COM

    Thank you.

    Jul 20, 2008 | 5:09 pm

     
  81. Didit says:

    Hi guys…

    Can anybody tell me if there are any environmental impacts related to taho-making business?

    Need it for my research. Thanks!

    Sep 22, 2008 | 9:20 am

     
  82. bosong says:

    yes it is very true that plaster of Paris is one of the ingredients in making taho and tofu. it is actually anhydrous calcium sulfate that makes it curd. without it, you can’t make taho or tofu. when it is newly incorporated to a soy milk, it is considered taho. but if it is dehydrated more, you’ll have a tofu.

    Sep 29, 2008 | 6:36 pm

     
  83. diday says:

    I can relate to schatzli, entry Nov 24, 2005. I can’t remember anyone selling/peddling taho in Cebu. The first time I tasted it was in 2006, when I visited my husband’s family in Manila. My late father-in-law introduced it to me. My husband gulps it with gusto. In Darwin, I tried freshly made soft tofu from a Vietnamese vendor and added maple syrup. Isn’t there a touch of peanuts in the syrup?

    Oct 18, 2008 | 1:15 pm

     
  84. luck30dude says:

    may i know what ratio of cougulating sholdbe added to form good taho.

    Mar 10, 2009 | 9:54 am

     
  85. Taho Station says:

    Plaster of Paris is used primarily to cast broken bones! To solidify Taho Mix (special blend of Soy Milk), you need Food Grade Calcium Sulfate or Magnesium Sulfate. You will easily taste Taho processed using Plaster of Paris because you will never miss the ‘sandy’ taste … mabuha-buhangin!

    @luck30dude … the ratio of Solidifying agent depends on the consistency and pureness of Taho Mix. Only an experience Taho maker will know how much agent he puts. Many times, they use their hands to measure … isa or dalawang dakot!

    Taho and Soy Milk is natures gift to female … please eat taho or drink soy milk everyday because they health benefit is so enormous.

    Apr 7, 2009 | 10:09 pm

     
  86. Jay Velasco says:

    TahoKing Authentic taho made super easy. Global shipping. Soy from USA. Comes with full instructions and tech support. Will ship for home or Business Volume. Our product has no soaking, no grinding, and no straining (literally) INVOLVED!

    Jayv927@msn.com

    Apr 24, 2009 | 1:22 am

     
  87. sally velasco says:

    where can we buy a finish product of “taho”. we are interested to do a business here in Manila.

    May 20, 2009 | 8:57 pm

     
 

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