10 Jul2008

What is Lupo?

by Marketman

lupo1

An edible weed, Gil Carandang replied. He was holding a bunch of lupo that has a slightly bitter tinge to it and he suggested adding it to a pot of ginisang munggo, instead of say ampalay tendrils. Well known to those who hail from Iloilo, I had never come across this leafy green before and some of our crew said it can sometimes be found roadside, as in literally a type of weed or grass, which grows abundantly. I tried to find an English or scientific name for it but was unsuccessful. There isn’t much on the web about this ingredient either. So if you know anything more about it, I and some of the other Marketmanila readers would appreciate your input or comments… thanks!

lupo2

 

COMMENTS:

  1. Maricel says:

    I am not sure but it may also be known as talinum.

    Jul 10, 2008 | 5:25 pm

     
  2. edel says:

    ^ yup, looks like talinum
    my mother used to cook it with monggo. sometimes it is available in kalentong and gabby’s market

    Jul 10, 2008 | 6:11 pm

     
  3. leticia says:

    in my hometown, pandan, antique, we call it lupo lupo. it grows in ricefields after harvest time.

    it is ideal with ginisang monggo, as mr carandang suggests.

    it has a taste similar to “rucola”.

    Jul 10, 2008 | 9:34 pm

     
  4. perkycinderella says:

    In Negros Occidental where I grew up, this grows abundantly in sugarcane fields. We cook lupo with a cup of water, dilis, tomatoes, onions (similar to laswa) – delicious!

    Jul 11, 2008 | 1:49 am

     
  5. thelma says:

    I JUST LOVE LEAFY VEGETABLES, EITHER STEAMED WITH A LITTLE BUTTER, SALT AND PEPPER OR SAUTEED WITH SOY SAUCE, SUGAR, MIRIN AND A LITTLE VINEGAR. ! I WOULD REALLY LIKE TO TRY THIS ONE. WOULD THERE BE SOME LUPO SEEDS THAT I CAN BUY WHEN I GO THERE FOR A SHORT VACATION IN DECEMBER? I WILL ALSO ADD A VISIT TO THE SALCEDO MARKET ON MY “TO DO” LIST. THANK YOU,MM,
    FOR SHARING THIS TO YOUR READERS…

    Jul 11, 2008 | 2:44 am

     
  6. Jack says:

    my dad’s fave veggies

    Jul 11, 2008 | 3:37 am

     
  7. natie says:

    yeah!!!! cooked with ginisang monggo with pork maybe, or dilis.

    Jul 11, 2008 | 5:26 am

     
  8. B says:

    I don’t think it’s talinum. Might be this:

    http://www.stuartxchange.com/CurlyDock.html

    Jul 11, 2008 | 10:17 am

     
  9. lee says:

    yeah… lupo! mapait kag manamit

    Jul 11, 2008 | 12:12 pm

     
  10. Cecile J says:

    Ah, could this be the same veggie called talilong? (As in “hilong talilong”?)

    Jul 11, 2008 | 4:56 pm

     
  11. tulip says:

    LUPO stands for Lupinus polyphyllus or Lupinus polycarpa(polycarpus?)technically, as far as I can remember (and another name, from another family which I forgot). Its a herb, I think. Not so sure,cant remember how those look like…just guessing for now.Will check on it later as Im runnin out of time now.

    Jul 12, 2008 | 2:13 am

     
  12. bethp says:

    Geezz, something is really wrong with me, coz’ even just a picture of lupo made me so excited and go wax nostalgic about it.Yup,as an ilonggo I’m very familiar with this veggie, my mother use to add it in our bangus soup or in ginisang munggo.I love it! Now, if only I can find lupo here in Belgium, maybe I will be one happy camper, but of course that’s just impossible….

    Jul 14, 2008 | 4:02 am

     
  13. OJ Kusinero says:

    i wold love to try Lupo. but it’s not Talinum. same usage but kind of sour when eaten fresh really good in sinigang and ginisang munggo, i make it like a wilted salad greens & kesong puti with Nouc Nan dressing. Talinum have broader oval leaves and the flowers are blue & the seed pods pop when mature, ready for sowing itself. drop in the dish last minute off the fire to retain its green color & flavor. found along side roads & empty lots.

    Jul 14, 2008 | 6:30 pm

     
  14. jorp says:

    aside from monggo, we also use lupo as greens for fish sinigang in lieu of kamote/kangkong

    Sep 8, 2008 | 12:18 am

     
  15. Elot Aguro says:

    Lupo are green weeds usually find along the ricefield trails. In my hometown (Dao, Capiz, Philippines) we used to saute it with mongo and dried anchovies (bulinaw) and it taste best. It is also used as substitute for Kamote or Kangkong leves for sinigang. Manamit gid.

    Jan 30, 2010 | 6:31 am

     
  16. kittel says:

    as a child,i used to hate eating Lupo,but now, we rarely find it because most ricefields are already contaminated with heavy pesticides.it sure goes well with ginisang munggo and shrimp! and i wonder why my post says that I’m from China when I’m in Bacolod…

    May 13, 2010 | 9:32 pm

     
  17. rhea says:

    hi..i am currently researching on lupo..i just heard it is edible and i got of some from my tito..i would like to determine its phenolic content and antioxidative activity..hope you could help me get some information..like scientific name and other common names..thanks!:)

    Jun 26, 2010 | 8:46 am

     
 

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